CLEAVING

Julie Powell thought cooking her way through Julia Child’s Mastering the Art of French Cooking was the craziest thing she’d ever do--until she embarked on the voyage recounted in her new memoir, CLEAVING.

Her marriage challenged by an insane, irresistible love affair, Julie decides to leave town and immerse herself in a new obsession: butchery. She finds her way to Fleischer’s, a butcher shop where she buries herself in the details of food. She learns how to break down a side of beef and French a rack of ribs--tough, physical work that only sometimes distracts her from thoughts of afternoon trysts.

The camaraderie at Fleischer’s leads Julie to search out fellow butchers around the world--from South America to Europe to Africa. At the end of her odyssey, she has learned a new art and perhaps even mastered her unruly heart.

CLEAVING Audio Excerpt

 

JULIE & JULIA

Julie Powell, nearing thirty and trapped in a dead-end secretarial job, resolves to reclaim her life by cooking in the span of a single year, every one of the 524 recipes in Julia Child’s legendary Mastering the Art of French Cooking. Her unexpected reward: not just a newfound respect for calves’ livers and aspic, but a new life-lived with gusto.

Praise for JULIE & JULIA

  • A TIME Magazine Criticís Choice
  • A Borders Original Voices pick
  • Finalist for Borders Original Voices Nonfiction Book of the Year
  • A Food & Wine Must-Have Book of 2005
  • Bestseller lists: the New York Times extended, the San Francisco Chronicle (#10), and the Cincinnati Inquirer as well as PW and Book Sense lists

JULIE & JULIA Audio Excerpt

“[H]ilarious Powell discovers incredible determination and hidden talents in cooking, writing and living. This is a joyful, humorous account of one womanís efforts to find meaning in her life.”—Vanessa Bush, Booklist

“[L]ively. . . .laugh-out-loud funny. Julie & Julia glides by on prose that alternates between buttery smooth and exceedingly, but hilariously, salty. Writing about her life, sheís funny as hell, often obscene, with a largely unquotable vocabulary. Writing about food, she ís sensual, deliberate, and original.” —Clea Simon, Boston Globe

“Julia Child has provided Julie Powell with something more than a manual to better cooking and eating; she has given her all of us, really the steps to a better life through the sensuous appreciation of the world. And through Julie and Julia, we learn how to take those precious steps forward, tablespoon by tablespoon.” Chicago Tribune

“Lowdown Spirited and funny, Powell leaves us hungry for more.”Entertainment Weekly

“[F]unny, charming and useful.”Good Housekeeping

“Powell is a blast of fresh air.”Miami Herald

“Julie and Julia satisfies immensely, and calls to be consumed in large, gluttonous mouthfuls.”New York Observer

“Ultimately, as the title indicates, it turns out that Julie and Julia are the perfect pair. Both have a piquant sense of humor, and both achieve fulfillment not only through cooking and eating, but through writing.”New York Sun

“[D]arkly funny... Bracingly original, [Julie & Julia] is clearly the work of a writer who has reclaimed her soul.” People

“Irresistible. A kind of Bridget Jones meets the French Chef.”
Philadelphia Inquirer

“Powell’s book has slashing humor galore but also surprising insight.” —John Marshall, Seattle Post-Intelligencer

“Powell is not a domestic goddess; she ís emphatically, unembarrassedly a domestic mortal. But she is also a genuinely gifted thinker and writer about food. As we learn in the account of her culinary marathon, Childís gastronomical masterpiece teaches Powell precious lessons about herself.” TIME Magazine

“[O]ften hysterical For anyone who has ever burnt the Sunday roast, scorched a frying pan or (worst case scenario) set fire to the kitchen.”USA Today

“Readers will come away from this year of cooking with a deeper appreciation of all things culinary and a renewed determination to follow Powellís lead and master the art of living.” —Carol Memmott, USA Today

“You don’t have to like cooking or French food to enjoy the zippiness of Ms. Powell’s prose or to admire the purpose of her project. If our own grueling endeavors rarely bring the insight we imagined, or the transformation for which we hoped, Julie & Julia at last affords us the pleasure of cheering for Ms. Powell as she attempts her own. And she really did change her life. Now she’s a writer. A good one.” —Cameron Stracher, Wall Street Journal